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Prof. Roberto Bruni

Contact information: r.bruni@unicas.it

Term: Second Semester

Credits (ECTS): 9

Prerequisites: None

Language of Instruction: English

Class hours: 63

LEARNING OBJECTIVES:

Cognitive / Knowledge skills

  • Understanding of the service management and principle of marketing applied to the service in a new perspective based on the value co-creation approach, the win-win logic
  • Understanding the passage from traditional management to the service management
  • Studying the role of ‘service’ and value co-creation defining the value proposition of the organizations
  • Applying knowledge and understanding, and problem solving abilities in complex environments within broader (or multidisciplinary) contexts related to their field of study; in that sense the course provides the stimuli to this kind of competence applying advanced management and marketing methods
  • Obtaining the ability to integrate knowledge and formulating judgements considering entropy, variety and variability of the contexts; these concepts are particularly analyzed considering the multidisciplinary approach and the different perspectives proposed by the course.

Analytical / Critical Thinking Skills (Oral & Written)

  • Applying innovative marketing and management approach to the networks of actors in the economic environment
  • Analyze the role of technology, knowledge and competences, managing complexity and identifying the path to realize the company’ value proposition
  • Identifying the evolutionary trends in service management studying service marketing approach and changing the perspective of the interaction between actors in markets
  • Communicate the conclusions, and the knowledge and rationale underpinning these, to specialist and non-specialist audiences clearly; in particular the work in group and the class presentations are useful to increase the ability to work in team and to present the results;
  • Have the learning skills to allow to continue to study and to work individually or in organizations in a manner that may be largely self-directed or autonomous. In particular the student will be able to approach following the system thinking

 

COURSE DESCRIPTION:

The whole Service Management course is conceptually divided in 2 parts: SM1 and SM2. The two parts of the course present an integrated and complementary program. In particular:

SM1. It characterizes the first part of the course and considers the system dynamic and the relations and interactions between the actors in the business environment affected by the technology innovation, new institutions and high level of communication and complexity in interaction. The course in this first part is based on the evolution of the traditional management approach toward the innovative and dynamic frameworks of network and systems theory and Service Dominant (S-D) Logic.
Network theories have shifted the focus from the dyadic relationship between a single supplier and a single customer to a multi-party, network approach (Gummesson, 2004), investigating relations between the nodes/actors and the dynamics of the interactions among firms and other economic actors. Systems theories are useful to identify general references that can be extended to every type of relational activity between actors and/or elements, which can support the understanding of complex phenomena. Different approaches have been used for systems analysis, including viable systems service systems, system dynamics and smart systems. With regard to system dynamics and smart systems, many studies have contributed to a better understanding of the influence of systems theories on business topics.
Building on these research streams, it is important to focus attention on those resources that constitute the foundational representations of the basic elements of a company’s value proposition. These resources can form the basis of the interactions between the actors, and also contribute to defining the value perception.
Service-Dominant logic of marketing, introduced by Vargo and Lusch (2004, 2008) as a theoretical proposal founded on the co-creation of value, service and resource integration based on interaction and networked relationships. This perspective emphasizes that the source of value creation is through the exchange of intangibles, specialized skills and knowledge, and processes, rather than through the exchange of tangible goods via discrete transactions between firm and customer. Value creation is accomplished through the use and integration of the resources available to all parties in the relationship. Moreover, value is always uniquely and phenomenologically determined by the beneficiary

SM2. It characterizes the second part of the course. It represents a new focus on the S-D logic and on the role of this research stream in marketing and management. Through the S-D Logic framework the concept of value co-creation is analysed in depth and, in particular, a parallel with the traditional marketing perspective is presented. In that way, how value is conceptualized and determined is a key issue. The S-D logic sees value as perceived and determined by the customer on the basis of ‘value in use’ - resulting from the application of operant resources. Firms can, therefore, only make ‘value propositions’, as articulated in this proposition: ‘The enterprise cannot deliver value, but only offer value propositions’. These value propositions may or may not be taken up by customers .This means therefore, that; ‘A service-centred view is inherently customer-oriented and relational’. How the firm and customer interact is consequently crucial. In S-D logic perspective regards the customer primarily as an operant resource, who combines with firm resources to co-create value. Accordingly, customers are active participants in relational exchanges and co-production through the integration of their individual (and possibly collective) resources; thus, as articulated in FP9: ‘All social and economic actors are resource integrators’. As result, the actual definition of value is ultimately defined by the customer.
Considering this system of interaction between actors, value and relationships, the traditional principle of marketing are illustrated and new perspectives on these are presented illustrating the differences between the advanced research suggestions. In the middle of the course, the theory are condensed in a marketing plan and the students will have the opportunity to try to write a marketing plan presenting the advances in marketing mix, passing from the traditional 4Ps to the ‘more relational’ 4Cs. The S-D Logic approach is presented as a useful framework that helps managers to understand the ‘entangled’ world made by value and relationships.

 

INSTRUCTIONAL FORMAT:

The class will meet for lectures twice a week, for a total of 32 sessions. Each week will expect 2 lectures composed by 2 hours. Classes will consist of lectures by the instructor, to be followed by a discussion of the main topics and the assigned case. Seminars are considered and during the lectures addictive information will be provided.

 

FORMS OF ASSESSMENT:

SM1 is the first part of the course, based on a traditional approach. In particular, is organized as follows:

 

FORM OF ASSESSMENT

VALUE

Class Participation        

 

Group Case Study Presentation

10%

Final written and oral exam

90%

 

SM1 ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW:

Class Participation:  It is positively considered the participation in class discussions, the capacity of the students to introduce ideas and thoughts dealing with the texts, the ability to use language effectively, and to present personal analyses in intellectual, constructive argumentation. If it is impossible attend classes the specific participation can be shown by interacting with your instructor during office hours, i.e. by asking about specific subjects of the syllabus and discussing assignments.

Group Case Study Presentation: The class will be divided in teams to work on presentations about specific topics. In particular short works will be considered simply to have an exchange of information and a relational activity during the lectures. During the course, the instructor will give information about topics and the groups will be free to make their efforts about the little projects. The ability to present in 15 minutes the relevant key points of the subject will be evaluated.

SM1 Final Exam: The abilities will be tested in two important areas of competency: the amount of information you master; the accuracy of the information you present.

Structure of the written exam:

  • First part (6 open-ended questions for 3 marks per question. Total marks in first part: 18)
  • Second part (2 open-ended questions for 6 marks per question. Total marks in second part: 12)

The grade gained in SM1 will be part of the final grade in SM 10 CFU exam

 

SM2 is the second  part of the course and the assessment is based on a system of activities. In particular, is organized as follows:

 

The instructor will use differentiated forms of assessment to calculate the final grade you will receive for this course. For the record, these are listed and weighted below. The content, criteria and specific requirements for each assessment category will be explained in greater detail in class.

 

FORM OF ASSESSMENT

VALUE

Class Participation        

 

Group Case Study Presentation

10%

Marketing Plan: the draft

10%

Final written and oral exam

80%

 

 

SM2 ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW:

Class Participation:  It is positively considered the participation in class discussions, the capacity of the students to introduce ideas and thoughts dealing with the texts, the ability to use language effectively, and to present personal analyses in intellectual, constructive argumentation. If it is impossible attend classes the specific participation can be shown by interacting with your instructor during office hours, i.e. by asking about specific subjects of the syllabus and discussing assignments.

Group Case Study Presentation: The class will be divided in teams to work on Marketing Plans chosen by the students. Students, in the middle of the course, will choose a company (follow specific information by the instructor) working on the Marketing Plan. At the starting point of the process, each group will present the idea in a ‘one shot slide’ (1 ppoint slide) in 3 minutes, discussing in class. In a second step, the Marketing Plan will be presented in class, supporting the team discussion with a Microsoft Power Point presentation (maximum 15 slides). The ability to present in 15 minutes the relevant key points of the plan by a team discussion and the coherence between ideas, project, expected results and budget will be evaluated. The value of this activity is considered with a maximum of 3 marks to be added to the final written exam.

Marketing Plan – the draft -: Students will be required to submit a draft to the instructor by mail– maximum 15 pages A4 MS-Word format, line spacing 1.5, font calibri 12points – illustrating the Marketing Plan in details, using suggestions received in class during the presentation and writing a document in a professional format. The student will have time to improve their project and write the draft until a period before the final exam. The exact deadline of draft submission will be communicated during the course. The value of this activity is considered with a maximum of 3 marks to be added to the final written exam.

Sm2 Final Exam: The abilities of the students will be tested in two important areas of competency: the amount of information you master; the accuracy of the information you present.

Structure of the written exam:

  • First part (6 open-ended questions for 3 marks per question. Total marks in first part: 18)
  • Second part (2 open-ended questions for 6 marks per question. Total marks in second part: 12)

The marks gained with the class activities will be added to the grade of the written exam (maximum marks added: 6)

The final exam will generally include an oral examination through which the instructor will assess the significance you ascribe to the facts and ideas you have integrated across your study in this course.

FINAL GRADE in Service Management (10 CFU): Average between SM1 Final Grade and SM2 Final Grade.

 

CLASS/INSTRUCTOR POLICIES:

Professionalism and communications: As a student, you are expected to maintain a professional, respectful and conscientious manner in the classroom with your instructors and fellow peers.
You are expected to take your academic work seriously and engage actively in your classes. Advance preparation, completing your assignments, showing a focused and respectful attitude is expected of all students. Simply showing up for class or meeting minimum outlined criteria will not earn you a good grade in this course. Utilizing communications, properly addressing your faculty and staff, asking questions and expressing your views respectfully demonstrate your professionalism and cultural sensitivity.

Attendance and Classroom behavior: Although attendance is not compulsory, it is highly recommended. All students must have a respectful attitude towards the professor as well as the classmates.

Arriving late / departing early from Class: Once they have decided to attend, students must behave consistently. Arriving late or leaving class early is disruptive and shows a lack of respect for instructor and fellow students.

Make-up classes: The instructor reserves the right to schedule make-up classes in the event of an unforeseen or unavoidable schedule change. Make-up classes may be scheduled outside of typical class hours, as necessary. 

Missing Examinations: Examinations will not be rescheduled. Pre-arranged travel or anticipated absence does not constitute an emergency and requests for missing or rescheduling exams will not be granted.

Use of Cell Phones, Laptops and Other Electronic Devices: Always check with your instructor about acceptable usage of electronic devices in class. Use of a cell phone for phone calls, text messages, emails, or any other purposes during class is impolite, inappropriate and prohibited. The use of a laptop, tablets or of cell phones is prohibited during all tests and exams.

 

REQUIRED READINGS:

Listed below are the required course textbooks and additional readings. These are required materials for the course and you are expected to have constant access to them from the very beginning of the course for reading, highlighting and note-taking. It is required that you have unrestricted access to each. Access to additional sources required for certain class sessions may be provided in paper or electronic format consistent with applicable copyright legislation.

Required texts SM1:

Lusch, R. F., & Vargo, S. L. (2014). Service-dominant logic: Premises, perspectives, possibilities. Cambridge University Press.

 Recommended readings SM1

Vargo, S. L., & Lusch, R. F. (2016). Institutions and axioms: an extension and update of service-dominant logic. Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, 44(1), 5-23.

Barile, S., & Polese, F. (2010). Linking the viable system and many-to-many network approaches to service-dominant logic and service science. International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, 2(1), 23-42.

Borgatti, S. P., & Halgin, D. S. (2011). On network theory. Organization science, 22(5), 1168-1181.

Required texts SM2:

Kotler, P., & Armstrong, G. (2010). Principles of marketing. Pearson education.

Recommended readings SM2

Gronroos, C. (1994). From Scientific Management to Service Management. International Journal of Service Industry Management, 5(1), 5-20.

Gummesson, E., Lusch, R. F., & Vargo, S. L. (2010). Transitioning from service management to service-dominant logic: Observations and recommendations. International Journal of Quality and Service Sciences, 2(1), 8-22.

Galvagno, M., & Dalli, D. (2014). Theory of value co-creation: a systematic literature review. Managing Service Quality, 24(6), 643-683.

Sansone, M., Tartaglione, A. M., & Bruni, R. (2012). How do companies achieve their marketing goals with social networks?. Chinese Business Review, 11(11).

Online Reference & Research Tools:

http://www.sdlogic.net/index.html

Service-Dominant (S-D) Logic is a mindset for a unified understanding of the purpose and nature of organizations, markets and society.  The foundational proposition of S-D logic is that organizations, markets, and society are fundamentally concerned with exchange of service—the applications of competences (knowledge and skills) for the benefit of a party.

Https://www.ama.org/pages/default.aspx

The American Marketing Association (AMA) is the essential community for marketers. In 1953, Neil Borden transformed the business world when he articulated the strategy of “marketing mix” in his AMA presidential address. Borden was just one of many AMA leaders who were not satisfied with existing best practices. These thought leaders sought answers for the future that would propel business growth and elevate the role of marketing. Today, the AMA leads an unparalleled discussion on marketing excellence. Continuing in the tradition of Borden and so many others, the AMA offers differentiated content that focuses on the tension between best versus next practices™ (by American Marketing Association – website – July, 2017).

[Ultima modifica: mercoledì 13 settembre 2017]