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Service Management (codice 91889)

Curriculum: Global Economy and Business del corso di Global economy and business
Programmazione per l'A.A.: 2020/2021

Appelli d'esame: Calendario - Prenotazioni
Orari del corso di Global economy and business: apri


Crediti Formativi Universitari (CFU): 9
Settore Scientifico Disciplinare (SSD): SECS-P/08
Ambito disciplinare: Aziendale
Attività: Attività formative caratterizzanti (B)
Ore aula: 63

Canale unico
  • Docente: BRUNI ROBERTO Scheda informativa del docente BRUNI

Obiettivi:

Programma:
The whole Service Management course is conceptually divided in 2 parts: SM1 and SM2. The two parts of the course present an integrated and complementary program. In particular:
SM1. It characterizes the first part of the course and considers the system dynamic and the relations and interactions between the actors in the business environment affected by the technology innovation, new institutions and high level of communication and complexity in interaction. The course in this first part is based on the evolution of the traditional management approach toward the innovative and dynamic frameworks of network and systems theory and Service Dominant (S-D) Logic.
Network theories have shifted the focus from the dyadic relationship between a single supplier and a single customer to a multi-party, network approach (Gummesson, 2004), investigating relations between the nodes/actors and the dynamics of the interactions among firms and other economic actors. Systems theories are useful to identify general references that can be extended to every type of relational activity between actors and/or elements, which can support the understanding of complex phenomena. Different approaches have been used for systems analysis, including viable systems service systems, system dynamics and smart systems. With regard to system dynamics and smart systems, many studies have contributed to a better understanding of the influence of systems theories on business topics.
Building on these research streams, it is important to focus attention on those resources that constitute the foundational representations of the basic elements of a company’s value proposition. These resources can form the basis of the interactions between the actors, and also contribute to defining the value perception.
Service-Dominant logic of marketing, introduced by Vargo and Lusch (2004, 2008) as a theoretical proposal founded on the co-creation of value, service and resource integration based on interaction and networked relationships. This perspective emphasizes that the source of value creation is through the exchange of intangibles, specialized skills and knowledge, and processes, rather than through the exchange of tangible goods via discrete transactions between firm and customer. Value creation is accomplished through the use and integration of the resources available to all parties in the relationship. Moreover, value is always uniquely and phenomenologically determined by the beneficiary
SM2. It characterizes the second part of the course. It represents a new focus on the S-D logic and on the role of this research stream in marketing and management. Through the S-D Logic framework the concept of value co-creation is analysed in depth and, in particular, a parallel with the traditional marketing perspective is presented. In that way, how value is conceptualized and determined is a key issue. The S-D logic sees value as perceived and determined by the customer on the basis of ‘value in use’ - resulting from the application of operant resources. Firms can, therefore, only make ‘value propositions’, as articulated in this proposition: ‘The enterprise cannot deliver value, but only offer value propositions’. These value propositions may or may not be taken up by customers .This means therefore, that; ‘A service-centred view is inherently customer-oriented and relational’. How the firm and customer interact is consequently crucial. In S-D logic perspective regards the customer primarily as an operant resource, who combines with firm resources to co-create value. Accordingly, customers are active participants in relational exchanges and co-production through the integration of their individual (and possibly collective) resources; thus, as articulated in FP9: ‘All social and economic actors are resource integrators’. As result, the actual definition of value is ultimately defined by the customer.
Considering this system of interaction between actors, value and relationships, the traditional principle of marketing are illustrated and new perspectives on these are presented illustrating the differences between the advanced research suggestions. In the middle of the course, the theory are condensed in a marketing plan and the students will have the opportunity to try to write a marketing plan presenting the advances in marketing mix, passing from the traditional 4Ps to the ‘more relational’ 4Cs. The S-D Logic approach is presented as a useful framework that helps managers to understand the ‘entangled’ world made by value and relationships.




INSTRUCTIONAL FORMAT
The class will meet for lectures twice a week, for a total of 32 sessions. Each week will expect 2 lectures composed by 2 hours. Classes will consist of lectures by the instructor, to be followed by a discussion of the main topics and the assigned case. Seminars are considered and during the lectures addictive information will be provided.

Testi:
Listed below are the required course textbooks and additional readings. These are required materials for the course and you are expected to have constant access to them from the very beginning of the course for reading, highlighting and note-taking. It is required that you have unrestricted access to each. Access to additional sources required for certain class sessions may be provided in paper or electronic format consistent with applicable copyright legislation.

Required texts SM1:
Lusch, R. F., & Vargo, S. L. (2014). Service-dominant logic: Premises, perspectives, possibilities. Cambridge University Press.

Required texts SM2:
Kotler, P., & Armstrong, G. (2010). Principles of marketing. Pearson education.


Service Management (codice 91889)

Curriculum: Dual Degree Unicas - Epoka University del corso di Global economy and business
Programmazione per l'A.A.: 2020/2021

Appelli d'esame: Calendario - Prenotazioni
Orari del corso di Global economy and business: apri


Crediti Formativi Universitari (CFU): 9
Settore Scientifico Disciplinare (SSD): SECS-P/08
Ambito disciplinare: A scelta dello studente
Attività: Attività formative a scelta dello studente (art.10, comma 5, lettera a) (D)
Ore aula: 63

Canale unico

Obiettivi:

Programma:
The whole Service Management course is conceptually divided in 2 parts: SM1 and SM2. The two parts of the course present an integrated and complementary program. In particular:
SM1. It characterizes the first part of the course and considers the system dynamic and the relations and interactions between the actors in the business environment affected by the technology innovation, new institutions and high level of communication and complexity in interaction. The course in this first part is based on the evolution of the traditional management approach toward the innovative and dynamic frameworks of network and systems theory and Service Dominant (S-D) Logic.
Network theories have shifted the focus from the dyadic relationship between a single supplier and a single customer to a multi-party, network approach (Gummesson, 2004), investigating relations between the nodes/actors and the dynamics of the interactions among firms and other economic actors. Systems theories are useful to identify general references that can be extended to every type of relational activity between actors and/or elements, which can support the understanding of complex phenomena. Different approaches have been used for systems analysis, including viable systems service systems, system dynamics and smart systems. With regard to system dynamics and smart systems, many studies have contributed to a better understanding of the influence of systems theories on business topics.
Building on these research streams, it is important to focus attention on those resources that constitute the foundational representations of the basic elements of a company’s value proposition. These resources can form the basis of the interactions between the actors, and also contribute to defining the value perception.
Service-Dominant logic of marketing, introduced by Vargo and Lusch (2004, 2008) as a theoretical proposal founded on the co-creation of value, service and resource integration based on interaction and networked relationships. This perspective emphasizes that the source of value creation is through the exchange of intangibles, specialized skills and knowledge, and processes, rather than through the exchange of tangible goods via discrete transactions between firm and customer. Value creation is accomplished through the use and integration of the resources available to all parties in the relationship. Moreover, value is always uniquely and phenomenologically determined by the beneficiary
SM2. It characterizes the second part of the course. It represents a new focus on the S-D logic and on the role of this research stream in marketing and management. Through the S-D Logic framework the concept of value co-creation is analysed in depth and, in particular, a parallel with the traditional marketing perspective is presented. In that way, how value is conceptualized and determined is a key issue. The S-D logic sees value as perceived and determined by the customer on the basis of ‘value in use’ - resulting from the application of operant resources. Firms can, therefore, only make ‘value propositions’, as articulated in this proposition: ‘The enterprise cannot deliver value, but only offer value propositions’. These value propositions may or may not be taken up by customers .This means therefore, that; ‘A service-centred view is inherently customer-oriented and relational’. How the firm and customer interact is consequently crucial. In S-D logic perspective regards the customer primarily as an operant resource, who combines with firm resources to co-create value. Accordingly, customers are active participants in relational exchanges and co-production through the integration of their individual (and possibly collective) resources; thus, as articulated in FP9: ‘All social and economic actors are resource integrators’. As result, the actual definition of value is ultimately defined by the customer.
Considering this system of interaction between actors, value and relationships, the traditional principle of marketing are illustrated and new perspectives on these are presented illustrating the differences between the advanced research suggestions. In the middle of the course, the theory are condensed in a marketing plan and the students will have the opportunity to try to write a marketing plan presenting the advances in marketing mix, passing from the traditional 4Ps to the ‘more relational’ 4Cs. The S-D Logic approach is presented as a useful framework that helps managers to understand the ‘entangled’ world made by value and relationships.




INSTRUCTIONAL FORMAT
The class will meet for lectures twice a week, for a total of 32 sessions. Each week will expect 2 lectures composed by 2 hours. Classes will consist of lectures by the instructor, to be followed by a discussion of the main topics and the assigned case. Seminars are considered and during the lectures addictive information will be provided.

Testi:
Listed below are the required course textbooks and additional readings. These are required materials for the course and you are expected to have constant access to them from the very beginning of the course for reading, highlighting and note-taking. It is required that you have unrestricted access to each. Access to additional sources required for certain class sessions may be provided in paper or electronic format consistent with applicable copyright legislation.

Required texts SM1:
Lusch, R. F., & Vargo, S. L. (2014). Service-dominant logic: Premises, perspectives, possibilities. Cambridge University Press.

Required texts SM2:
Kotler, P., & Armstrong, G. (2010). Principles of marketing. Pearson education.


[Ultima modifica: mercoledì 30 novembre 2016]