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NISTICO' SERGIO - Professore Associato

English version

Afferente a: Dipartimento: Economia e Giurisprudenza

Settore Scientifico Disciplinare: SECS-P/01

Orari di ricevimento: Primo semestre: Su appuntamento Secondo semestre: Mercoledì e Venerdì ore 12, stanza 4.07, quarto piano Palazzo della Folcara First semester: On appointment________________ Second semester: Wednesdays and Fridays at 12:00pm, room 4.07, fourth floor Folcara Building

Recapiti:
E-Mail: s.nistico@unicas.it
Telefono ufficio: +39 07762994670

  • Insegnamento Economics for business (91843)

    Primo anno di Economics and Entrepreneurship (LM-56), Curriculum unico
    Crediti Formativi Universitari (CFU): 9,00

    Programma:
    This course is structured in two modules that will be taught in parallel during the semester.
    The first module focuses on how entrepreneurs allocate between alternative uses the three fundamental sets of resources: (i) the physical resources, such as capital, land and intermediate goods; (ii) the financial resources, such as bank deposits, loans and securities; and (iii) the human resources, including the decision maker’s own time and skills, and those of other people whose efforts can be called upon to enhance firm’s performance.

    The main topics addressed in this module are:
    • The impact of changes in income and prices affect consumer’s consumption choices;
    • the notions of price-, income- and cross-elasticities of demand;
    • short-run and long-run strategic decisions about existing plant utilization and plant expansion/or shut down;
    • the various practices of ‘pricing’ available to firms operating both in competitive and non-competitive markets
    • break-even analysis and the management of productive capacity as a strategy to face volatility of demand;
    • the notion of Ricardian rent and why, in most cases, short run extra profits might be lost by the entrepreneur in the long run.

    The second module focuses on the analysis of those macroeconomic factors and variables mainly affecting firms’ decisions, such as output, aggregate demand, nominal and real interest rates, nominal and real exchange rates, price levels, monetary and fiscal policies, and their changes over time.

    In particular, students will understand:
    • the fundamental macroeconomic variables and how to measure them;
    • the Keynesian cross model as a tool to explain contexts of underemployment equilibrium;
    • the IS-LM model as a tool to determine the general equilibrium and the impact of economic policies both in a closed and an open economy;
    • the international environment and how changes in the exchange rates affect business decisions;

    Moreover, with reference to all topics listed above, students will develop a critical attitude towards the realism and the soundness of the assumptions underlying the various models and the ability to use the relevant elements of the economists’ toolbox to specific case studies.


    Instructional Format
    The class will meet for 2 hours (gross of interclass break), three times a week, for a total of 32 sessions. After an introduction aimed at providing the needed background, participants are required to read the materials related to the class and to be prepared prior to coming to class. Classes will consist of a lecture by the instructor, to be followed by a discussion of the main topics and, possibly, of the assignments.


    Tentative course schedule

    Week 1 (Earl and Wakeley, chapter 1; chap. 12, section1 )

    Part I
    Introduction to the Course. Presentation of the Available materials. Clear Statement of Expected Mutual Requirements. The role of economic models. Decision makers under imperfect information. Difference between knowledge and information.

    Part II
    Introduction to the course. Definition of fundamental macroeconomic variables and analysis of their impact on business decisions.

    Week 2 (Earl and Weakley, chapter 2; chapter 12, sections 2 and 3)

    Part I
    Market failures and the reasons for the existence of firms.

    Part II
    Definition of real and nominal GDP, and how to measure them. Changes of GDP over time. The composition of the GDP.

    Week 3 (The principle of comparative advantage; Earl and Weakley, chapter 3. chapter 12, section 4, first part)

    Part I
    Opportunity costs, comparative advantage and the reasons for trading with other firms. The role of entrepreneurs.

    Part II
    An economic model: Endogenous and Exogenous variables. Given factors. Equilibrium position. Short-run, medium run and long run models. Introduction to the Keynesian cross-model. The consumption function. Investment. Government Expenditure. Net Exports.


    Week 4 (Earl and Weakley, chapters3 and 4; chap. 12, section 4, second part)

    Part I
    Consumption theories and the tendency towards normal profits in competitive markets

    Part II
    The Keynesian cross-diagram. The multiplier. The Keynesian concepts of effective demand and underemployment equilibrium.


    Week 5 (Earl and Weakley, chapters 5 and 6. Readings provided by the instructor.)

    Part I
    Possible forms of the production function and of the cost curves in the short and in the long run. Returns to scale.

    Part II
    The Keynesian cross model as a tool to interpret practical(historical) cases of recession.


    Week 6 (Earl and Weakley, chapter 7. Blanchard, chapter 5, provided by the instructor)

    Part I
    Models of firms’ behaviour. The firm in a competitive market.

    Part II
    The IS-LM basic model for the determination of the general equilibrium position in a closed economy. Graphical derivation of the IS and LM curves.

    Mid-term exam on both part I and part II

    Week 7 (Earl and Weakley, chapter 7. Blanchard, chapter 5)

    Part I
    Pricing strategies in non-competitive markets.

    Part II
    Analysis of the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the general equilibrium position. Policy mix. ‘Crowding out’ effect.


    Week 8 (Earl and Weakley, chapters 7 and 8. Blanchard, chapter 19)

    Part I
    Break-even analysis and Andrews model of pricing

    Part II
    The extension of the IS-LM model to the open economy. Equations and diagrams.



    Week 9 (Earl and Weakley, chapter9. Blanchard, chapter 19, provided by the instructor)

    Part I
    Transaction costs, vertical integration and the evolution of industries.

    Part II
    The effects of fiscal and monetary policies in an international environment.

    Week 10 (The basic tool of finance. Earl and Weakley, chapter 14, first part)

    Part I
    The notions of present, future value and Internal Rate of Return to assess the profitability of investments.

    Part II
    Trade flows and financial flows. The balance of payment.

    Week 11 (Earl and Weakley, chapters 10 and 11. chapter 14, second part)

    Part I
    Finance and growth of the firm

    Part II
    How changes in the international environment affect firms’ behavior.

    Workload expectations
    All students are expected to spend at least 2,5 hours of time on academic studies outside of, and in addition to, each hour of class time.

    Testi:
    Listed below are the required course textbooks and additional readings. These are required materials for the course and you are expected to have constant access to them from the very beginning of the course for reading, highlighting and note-taking. It is required that you have unrestricted access to each. Access to additional sources required for certain class sessions may be provided in paper or electronic format consistent with applicable copyright legislation.

    Required texts:
    Earl, P. and T. Wakeley, Business Economics: a contemporary approach, McGraw-Hill, 2005.
    The basic tools of finance. Provided by the instructor.
    The principle of comparative advantage. Provided by the instructor.
    Blanchard, Macroeconomics, Chapters 5, 19, Pearson 2017, Provided by the instructor.
    Recommended readings (to be selected and assigned throughout the semester): The following primary and secondary materials, articles and readings are either available on the web or will be provided in Pdf format by the instructor through the GOMP and/or MOODLE platforms.
    Blanchard, O. The State of Advanced Economies and Related Policy Debates: A Fall 2016 Assessment, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Policy Brief, 16-14 2016.
    Krugman, P. Business vs. Economics, The New York Times,Nov2, 2014

    Online Reference &Research Tools
    1) www.federalreserve.gov
    The Federal Reserve System is the central bank of the United States. It was founded by Congress in 1913 to provide the nation with a safer, more flexible, and more stable monetary and financial system. Over the years, its role in banking and the economy has expanded.

    2) www.wto.org
    The World Trade Organization (WTO) deals with the rules of trade between nations at a global or near-global level

    3) www.bea.gov
    The Bureau of Economic Analysis (BEA) promotes a better understanding of the U.S. economy by providing the timeliest, relevant, and accurate economic accounts data in an objective and cost-effective manner.
    5) www.bls.gov
    The Bureau of Labor Statistics conducts research on many economic and statistical topics that are relevant to the BLS mission

    6) http://www.worldbank.com
    The World Bank is a vital source of financial and technical assistance to developing countries around the world. Our mission is to fight poverty with passion and professionalism for lasting results and to help people help themselves and their environment by providing resources, sharing knowledge, building capacity and forging partnerships in the public and private sectors

    7) http://www.ecb.int
    Since 1 January 1999 the European Central Bank (ECB) has been responsible for conducting monetary policy for the euro area - the world’s largest economy after the United States.

    Valutazione:
    The instructors will use various forms of assessment to calculate the final grade you receive for this course. For the record, these are listed and weighted below. The content, criteria and specific requirements for each assessment category will be explained in greater detail in class. Any questions about the requirements should be discussed directly with your faculty well in advance of the due date for each assignment.

    FORM OF ASSESSMENT VALUE
    Class Participation 10%
    Assignments 20%
    Mid-Term Exam* 30%
    Final Exam 40%


    ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW:
    Class Participation: This grade will be calculated to reflect your participation in class discussions, your capacity to introduce ideas and thoughts dealing with the texts, your ability use language effectively, and to present your analysis in intellectual, constructive argumentation. If you cannot attend classes your participation can be shown by interacting with your instructor during office hours, i.e. by asking about specific subjects of the syllabus and discussing assignments.

    Assignments: Students will be required to submit home assignments timely. These will be exercises on analytical and/or graphing tools, comments on suggested readings on examples of economic challenges, opportunities, problems or risks faced by households, firms or nations.

    Mid Term Exams*: The midterms are designed to establish and communicate to you the progress you are making towards meeting the course learning objectives on both Part I and Part II. Your abilities will be tested in two important areas of competency: the amount of information you master and the accuracy of the information you present.
    Structure: A combination of 6 to 10tests on each part, possibly including ‘true or false’, open questions, analytical exercises and graph comprehension. Prior to the examinations, a comprehensive review will be given during class.

    Final Exam: Your abilities will be tested in three important areas of competency: the amount of information you master; the accuracy of the information you present, your ability to apply your knowledge to discussing real-world cases.

    Structure: A combination of 12 tests, 6 on part I and 6 on part II, possibly including ‘true or false’, open questions, analytical exercises and graph comprehension. Prior to the examinations, a comprehensive review will be given during class. The final exam will generally include an oral discussion through which the instructor will assess the significance you ascribe to the facts and ideas you have integrated across your study in this course.

    *For students not attending classes, the mid-term exams will be waived and the grade will be calculated attributing a 70% percentage to the final exam.

  • Insegnamento Economics (91948)

    Primo anno di Global economy and business (LM-56), Dual Degree Unicas - Epoka University
    Crediti Formativi Universitari (CFU): 12,00

    Programma:
    Course Title:
    ECONOMICS
    Period: second semester

    Instructors
    SERGIO NISTICO' and ELEONORA SANFILIPPO
    contact information: s.nistico@unicas.it; e.sanfilippo@unicas.it

    Prerequisites: basic economics. Language of Instruction: English

    Overall Class hours: 84
    Class hours, part I:42
    Class hours, part II: 42
    Overall Credits (ECTS): 12

    This course is structured in two modules that will be taught in parallel during the semester.

    The first module deals with microeconomics, i.e. the set of tools economists use to study the choices made by individuals in their roles of consumers, employees, investors and business managers and the effects of individual choices on market outcomes.
    In particular, this first module focuses on:
    • rational choice theory and its claim that changes in income and prices are the determinants of consumer’s consumption choices;
    • the expected utility theory approach, according to which choices under uncertainty can be modeled as lotteries;
    • the demand for insurance policies and the limitations of the rational choice theory;
    • the difference between short-run and long-run cost functions;
    • how firms choose inputs, output and prices according to the different market structures in which they operate;
    • the difference between partial and general equilibrium analysis and the two fundamental welfare theorems;
    • why public goods and externalities represent the two main reasons for market failures and government intervention.

    The second module deals with the fundamental macroeconomics models, and their ability to interpret the real-world economic phenomena. The topics addressed by the instructor include the factors affecting changes in aggregate variables, such as GDP, unemployment rates, aggregate demand, aggregate supply, interest rates, price levels, and so on , in the context of contemporary monetary market economies.
    In particular, this second module focuses on:
    • the fundamental building blocks of Keynes’s macroeconomic theory;
    • the structure and the logic of the IS-LM model as a tool to determine the general equilibrium and the impact of economic policies both in a closed and an open economy;
    • the determinants of aggregate variables and how both fiscal and monetary policies can be effective tools for dampening business cycle and counteracting the main pathologies affecting actual economic systems, such as recession, unemployment, and crisis;
    • the main causes of unemployment and how to promote employment according to the different theoretical approaches;
    • the main determinants of economic growth;
    • how financial markets affect the real economy;
    • the relation between short-term and long-term interest rates through the yield curve and how expectations of financial markets are influenced by the behavior of central bank and the level of economic activity.

    With reference to all topics listed above, students will be asked to develop a critical attitude towards the realism and the soundness of the assumptions underlying the various models and the ability to use the relevant elements of the economists’ toolbox to specific case studies.

    INSTRUCTIONAL FORMAT
    The class will meet for 2 hours (gross of interclass break), four times a week, for a total of 42 sessions. In every week, one of the sessions will be devoted to exercise and case studies. After an introduction aimed at providing the needed background, participants are required to read the materials related to the class and to be prepared prior to coming to class. Classes will consist of a lecture by the instructor, to be followed by a discussion of the main topics and, possibly, of the assignments.

    TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

    Week 1 (Frank, chapters 1 and 2. Blanchard, chapters 1 and 2)

    Part I
    Introduction to the Course. Presentation of the Available materials. Clear Statement of Expected Mutual Requirements. The role of economic models. Thinking like an economist. Is Economics a Science? Graphing as one of the language of Economics: the budget constraint and indifference curves.

    Part II
    Introduction to the Course. Endogenous/exogenous variables and given factors. The distinction between short-run, medium-run and long-run models. Fundamental macroeconomic variables. Main economic indicators.

    Week 2 (Frank, Chapters 2 and 3. Blanchard, chapter 3)

    Part I
    Axioms of rational choice theory. The opportunity cost and the marginal rate of substitution. The best feasible bundle. The utility function approach.

    Part II
    The goods market. Main assumptions of Keynes’s model. The determination of the equilibrium level of the aggregate output using the Keynesian cross-diagram. The concept of underemployment equilibrium level of the output.

    Week 3 (Frank, appendix chapter 3 and appendix chapter 4. Blanchard, chapter 4)

    Part I
    The utility function approach. The income and substation effects of price change. The ordinary and the income compensated demand curve.

    Part II
    Financial Markets. Keynes’s theory of liquidity preference. Money supply and the determination of the equilibrium nominal interest rate. Two cases of ineffectiveness of expansionary monetary policy in Keynes’s model: Inelasticity of Investments and Liquidity Trap.

    Week 4 (Frank, chapter 5. Blanchard, chapters 5 and 6)

    Part I
    Applications of rational choice theory. The intertemporal choice

    Part II
    The IS-LM basic model for the determination of the general equilibrium position in a closed economy. Assumptions and results. Structure of the model and differences with Keynes’s model. Graphical derivation of the IS and LM curves. Analysis of the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the general equilibrium position. Policy mix. The extended IS-LM model. The relation between real interest rate, nominal interest rate and expected inflation. Financial shocks and economic policies.

    Week 5 (Frank, chapter 6 and appendix. Blanchard, chapter 7 and appendix)

    Part I
    Incomplete information and choices under uncertainty. The expected utility theory and its limits

    Part II
    Neoclassical theory of employment versus Keynes’s theory of employment. New-Keynesian theories of the labour market. Contract theory and efficiency-wage theory. The natural rate of unemployment.

    Week 6 (Frank, chapters 7 and 8. Blanchard, chapter 10)

    Part I
    Explaining altruism and concerns about fairness. Cognitive limitations and behavioral economics.

    Part II
    Solow’s model of growth. Assumptions and main results. The depreciation per worker and the investment per worker. The steady state position.

    Mid-term exam on both part I and part II

    Week 7 (Frank, chapter 9 and appendix; chapter 10. Blanchard, chapter 11 and appendix)

    Part I
    Production and costs in the short run. Production in the long run: isoquants, isocosts and returns to scale. Cost functions in the long run.

    Part II
    Output, investment and capital accumulation. The saving rate. The dynamics of capital and output. The effects of different saving rates on output per worker in an economy with and without technological progress. The human capital. Exogenous and endogenous growth.

    Week 8 (Frank, appendix chapter 10 and chapter 11. Blanchard, chapter 14)

    Part I
    Relationship between short-run and long-run cost curves. Cost minimization. The long-run industry supply curve in perfect competition

    Part II

    Financial markets and expectations. The determination of stock prices. Stock prices and economic activity. The analysis of the impact of economic policies on stock prices by using the IS-LM diagram. The speculative bubbles. The yield curve. The relation between short-term and long term interest rates.

    Week 9 (Frank, chapter 12. Blanchard, chapters 17 and 18)

    Part I
    Monopoly and the divergence between price and marginal revenue. Mark up and price elasticity of demand. Price discrimination. Public policy towards monopoly.

    Part II
    The open economy. The equilibrium of the goods market in the open economy. The real exchange rate and the nominal exchange rate. The choice between domestic and foreign assets: the (uncovered) interest parity condition.

    Week 10 (Frank, chapter 13. Blanchard, chapters 19 and 20)

    Part I
    Imperfect competition, oligopoly and game theory. The notion of Nash equilibrium. The Cournot model of duopoly and other economic models of imperfect competition.

    Part II
    The extension of the IS-LM model to the open economy. Equations and diagrams. Exchange rate regimes and monetary and fiscal policies.

    Week 11 (Frank, chapter 16 and chapter 18W. Blanchard, chapter 23)

    Part I
    Externalities, property rights and Coase theorem. Public goods. The general equilibrium model of exchange and the Edgeworth box. Pareto optimality and the two welfare theorems.

    Part II
    Monetary Policy. Money targeting. Inflation targeting. The interest rate rule. The Optimal Inflation rate. Conventional and unconventional monetary tools.

    WORKLOAD EXPECTATIONS
    All students are expected to spend at least 2.5 hours of time on academic studies outside of, and in addition to, each hour of class time.

    Testi:
    Listed below are the required course textbooks and additional readings. These are required materials for the course and you are expected to have constant access to them from the very beginning of the course for reading, highlighting and note-taking. It is required that you have unrestricted access to each. Access to additional sources required for certain class sessions may be provided in paper or electronic format consistent with applicable copyright legislation.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    Frank, R.H. Microeconomics and Behavior, Mc Graw Hill, 7th(or later)edition.
    Blanchard, Macroeconomics, Chapters 1-7, 10-11, 14, 17-19, 20, 23. Pearson 2017, 7th edition
    Recommended readings (to be selected and assigned throughout the semester): The following primary and secondary materials, articles and readings are either available on the web or will be provided in Pdf format by the instructor through the GOMP and/or MOODLE platforms.
    A series of Robert H. Frank’s articles published on the New York Times
    Ball, L. The case for 4% inflation,VOX CEPR's Policy Portal, May 24, 2013
    Blanchard, O. What Size Fiscal Deficits for the United States?, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Nov 21, 2016.
    Blanchard, O. The State of Advanced Economies and Related Policy Debates: A Fall 2016 Assessment,Peterson Institute for International Economics, Policy Brief, 16-14 2016.
    Blanchard, O. How the Eurozone Can Be Strengthened After Brexit, Peterson Institute for International Economics, June 27, 2016.
    De Long, B. We Really Do Need a 4%/Year Inflation Target, Bradford-delong.com: Grasping Reality with Both Hands, May 26, 2013
    Feldstein, M. Japan's growth strategy is all wrong, Project Syndicate, Jan 18, 2013
    Krugman, P. Japan Steps out,The New York Times,Jan13, 2013

    Online Reference & Research Tools:

    1) www.economist.com
    The website of The Economist contains data updated twice a day on output, unemployment, exchange rates, inflation, interest rates and stock prices for a large number of countries.

    2) www.imf.org/external/index.htm
    The website of the International Monetary Fund provides data on 187 member countries. A particularly useful publication is the World Economic Outlook, which is published twice a year and describes major economic events in the world and in specific member countries.

    Specific and updated data on monetary aggregates and policies are also to be found on the websites of the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank:
    3) www.federalreserve.gov

    4) http://www.ecb.int

    Valutazione:
    The instructors will use various forms of assessment to calculate the final grade you receive for this course. For the record, these are listed and weighted below. The content, criteria and specific requirements for each assessment category will be explained in greater detail in class. Any questions about the requirements should be discussed directly with your faculty well in advance of the due date for each assignment.

    FORM OF ASSESSMENT VALUE
    Class Participation 10%
    Assignments 20%
    Mid-Term Exam* 30%
    Final Exam 40%


    ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW:
    Class Participation: This grade will be calculated to reflect your participation in class discussions, your capacity to introduce ideas and thoughts dealing with the texts, your ability use language effectively, and to present your analysis in intellectual, constructive argumentation. If you cannot attend classes your participation can be shown by interacting with your instructor during office hours, i.e. by asking about specific subjects of the syllabus and discussing assignments.

    Assignments: Students will be required to submit home assignments timely. These will be exercises on analytical and/or graphing tools, comments on suggested readings on examples of economic challenges, opportunities, problems or risks faced by households, firms or nations.

    Mid Term Exams*: The midterms are designed to establish and communicate to you the progress you are making towards meeting the course learning objectives on both Part I and Part II. Your abilities will be tested in two important areas of competency: the amount of information you master and the accuracy of the information you present.
    Structure: A combination of 6 to 10tests on each part, possibly including ‘true or false’, open questions, analytical exercises and graph comprehension. Prior to the examinations, a comprehensive review will be given during class.

    Final Exam: Your abilities will be tested in three important areas of competency: the amount of information you master; the accuracy of the information you present, your ability to apply your knowledge to discussing real-world cases.

    Structure: A combination of 12 tests, 6 on part I and 6 on part II, possibly including ‘true or false’, open questions, analytical exercises and graph comprehension. Prior to the examinations, a comprehensive review will be given during class. The final exam will generally include an oral discussion through which the instructor will assess the significance you ascribe to the facts and ideas you have integrated across your study in this course.

    *For students not attending classes, the mid-term exams will be waived and the grade will be calculated attributing a 70% percentage to the final exam.

  • Insegnamento Economics (91948)

    Primo anno di Global economy and business (LM-56), Global Economy and Business
    Crediti Formativi Universitari (CFU): 12,00

    Programma:
    Course Title:
    ECONOMICS
    Period: second semester

    Instructors
    SERGIO NISTICO' and ELEONORA SANFILIPPO
    contact information: s.nistico@unicas.it; e.sanfilippo@unicas.it

    Prerequisites: basic economics. Language of Instruction: English

    Overall Class hours: 84
    Class hours, part I:42
    Class hours, part II: 42
    Overall Credits (ECTS): 12

    This course is structured in two modules that will be taught in parallel during the semester.

    The first module deals with microeconomics, i.e. the set of tools economists use to study the choices made by individuals in their roles of consumers, employees, investors and business managers and the effects of individual choices on market outcomes.
    In particular, this first module focuses on:
    • rational choice theory and its claim that changes in income and prices are the determinants of consumer’s consumption choices;
    • the expected utility theory approach, according to which choices under uncertainty can be modeled as lotteries;
    • the demand for insurance policies and the limitations of the rational choice theory;
    • the difference between short-run and long-run cost functions;
    • how firms choose inputs, output and prices according to the different market structures in which they operate;
    • the difference between partial and general equilibrium analysis and the two fundamental welfare theorems;
    • why public goods and externalities represent the two main reasons for market failures and government intervention.

    The second module deals with the fundamental macroeconomics models, and their ability to interpret the real-world economic phenomena. The topics addressed by the instructor include the factors affecting changes in aggregate variables, such as GDP, unemployment rates, aggregate demand, aggregate supply, interest rates, price levels, and so on , in the context of contemporary monetary market economies.
    In particular, this second module focuses on:
    • the fundamental building blocks of Keynes’s macroeconomic theory;
    • the structure and the logic of the IS-LM model as a tool to determine the general equilibrium and the impact of economic policies both in a closed and an open economy;
    • the determinants of aggregate variables and how both fiscal and monetary policies can be effective tools for dampening business cycle and counteracting the main pathologies affecting actual economic systems, such as recession, unemployment, and crisis;
    • the main causes of unemployment and how to promote employment according to the different theoretical approaches;
    • the main determinants of economic growth;
    • how financial markets affect the real economy;
    • the relation between short-term and long-term interest rates through the yield curve and how expectations of financial markets are influenced by the behavior of central bank and the level of economic activity.

    With reference to all topics listed above, students will be asked to develop a critical attitude towards the realism and the soundness of the assumptions underlying the various models and the ability to use the relevant elements of the economists’ toolbox to specific case studies.

    INSTRUCTIONAL FORMAT
    The class will meet for 2 hours (gross of interclass break), four times a week, for a total of 42 sessions. In every week, one of the sessions will be devoted to exercise and case studies. After an introduction aimed at providing the needed background, participants are required to read the materials related to the class and to be prepared prior to coming to class. Classes will consist of a lecture by the instructor, to be followed by a discussion of the main topics and, possibly, of the assignments.

    TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

    Week 1 (Frank, chapters 1 and 2. Blanchard, chapters 1 and 2)

    Part I
    Introduction to the Course. Presentation of the Available materials. Clear Statement of Expected Mutual Requirements. The role of economic models. Thinking like an economist. Is Economics a Science? Graphing as one of the language of Economics: the budget constraint and indifference curves.

    Part II
    Introduction to the Course. Endogenous/exogenous variables and given factors. The distinction between short-run, medium-run and long-run models. Fundamental macroeconomic variables. Main economic indicators.

    Week 2 (Frank, Chapters 2 and 3. Blanchard, chapter 3)

    Part I
    Axioms of rational choice theory. The opportunity cost and the marginal rate of substitution. The best feasible bundle. The utility function approach.

    Part II
    The goods market. Main assumptions of Keynes’s model. The determination of the equilibrium level of the aggregate output using the Keynesian cross-diagram. The concept of underemployment equilibrium level of the output.

    Week 3 (Frank, appendix chapter 3 and appendix chapter 4. Blanchard, chapter 4)

    Part I
    The utility function approach. The income and substation effects of price change. The ordinary and the income compensated demand curve.

    Part II
    Financial Markets. Keynes’s theory of liquidity preference. Money supply and the determination of the equilibrium nominal interest rate. Two cases of ineffectiveness of expansionary monetary policy in Keynes’s model: Inelasticity of Investments and Liquidity Trap.

    Week 4 (Frank, chapter 5. Blanchard, chapters 5 and 6)

    Part I
    Applications of rational choice theory. The intertemporal choice

    Part II
    The IS-LM basic model for the determination of the general equilibrium position in a closed economy. Assumptions and results. Structure of the model and differences with Keynes’s model. Graphical derivation of the IS and LM curves. Analysis of the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the general equilibrium position. Policy mix. The extended IS-LM model. The relation between real interest rate, nominal interest rate and expected inflation. Financial shocks and economic policies.

    Week 5 (Frank, chapter 6 and appendix. Blanchard, chapter 7 and appendix)

    Part I
    Incomplete information and choices under uncertainty. The expected utility theory and its limits

    Part II
    Neoclassical theory of employment versus Keynes’s theory of employment. New-Keynesian theories of the labour market. Contract theory and efficiency-wage theory. The natural rate of unemployment.

    Week 6 (Frank, chapters 7 and 8. Blanchard, chapter 10)

    Part I
    Explaining altruism and concerns about fairness. Cognitive limitations and behavioral economics.

    Part II
    Solow’s model of growth. Assumptions and main results. The depreciation per worker and the investment per worker. The steady state position.

    Mid-term exam on both part I and part II

    Week 7 (Frank, chapter 9 and appendix; chapter 10. Blanchard, chapter 11 and appendix)

    Part I
    Production and costs in the short run. Production in the long run: isoquants, isocosts and returns to scale. Cost functions in the long run.

    Part II
    Output, investment and capital accumulation. The saving rate. The dynamics of capital and output. The effects of different saving rates on output per worker in an economy with and without technological progress. The human capital. Exogenous and endogenous growth.

    Week 8 (Frank, appendix chapter 10 and chapter 11. Blanchard, chapter 14)

    Part I
    Relationship between short-run and long-run cost curves. Cost minimization. The long-run industry supply curve in perfect competition

    Part II

    Financial markets and expectations. The determination of stock prices. Stock prices and economic activity. The analysis of the impact of economic policies on stock prices by using the IS-LM diagram. The speculative bubbles. The yield curve. The relation between short-term and long term interest rates.

    Week 9 (Frank, chapter 12. Blanchard, chapters 17 and 18)

    Part I
    Monopoly and the divergence between price and marginal revenue. Mark up and price elasticity of demand. Price discrimination. Public policy towards monopoly.

    Part II
    The open economy. The equilibrium of the goods market in the open economy. The real exchange rate and the nominal exchange rate. The choice between domestic and foreign assets: the (uncovered) interest parity condition.

    Week 10 (Frank, chapter 13. Blanchard, chapters 19 and 20)

    Part I
    Imperfect competition, oligopoly and game theory. The notion of Nash equilibrium. The Cournot model of duopoly and other economic models of imperfect competition.

    Part II
    The extension of the IS-LM model to the open economy. Equations and diagrams. Exchange rate regimes and monetary and fiscal policies.

    Week 11 (Frank, chapter 16 and chapter 18W. Blanchard, chapter 23)

    Part I
    Externalities, property rights and Coase theorem. Public goods. The general equilibrium model of exchange and the Edgeworth box. Pareto optimality and the two welfare theorems.

    Part II
    Monetary Policy. Money targeting. Inflation targeting. The interest rate rule. The Optimal Inflation rate. Conventional and unconventional monetary tools.

    WORKLOAD EXPECTATIONS
    All students are expected to spend at least 2.5 hours of time on academic studies outside of, and in addition to, each hour of class time.

    Testi:
    Listed below are the required course textbooks and additional readings. These are required materials for the course and you are expected to have constant access to them from the very beginning of the course for reading, highlighting and note-taking. It is required that you have unrestricted access to each. Access to additional sources required for certain class sessions may be provided in paper or electronic format consistent with applicable copyright legislation.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    Frank, R.H. Microeconomics and Behavior, Mc Graw Hill, 7th(or later)edition.
    Blanchard, Macroeconomics, Chapters 1-7, 10-11, 14, 17-19, 20, 23. Pearson 2017, 7th edition
    Recommended readings (to be selected and assigned throughout the semester): The following primary and secondary materials, articles and readings are either available on the web or will be provided in Pdf format by the instructor through the GOMP and/or MOODLE platforms.
    A series of Robert H. Frank’s articles published on the New York Times
    Ball, L. The case for 4% inflation,VOX CEPR's Policy Portal, May 24, 2013
    Blanchard, O. What Size Fiscal Deficits for the United States?, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Nov 21, 2016.
    Blanchard, O. The State of Advanced Economies and Related Policy Debates: A Fall 2016 Assessment,Peterson Institute for International Economics, Policy Brief, 16-14 2016.
    Blanchard, O. How the Eurozone Can Be Strengthened After Brexit, Peterson Institute for International Economics, June 27, 2016.
    De Long, B. We Really Do Need a 4%/Year Inflation Target, Bradford-delong.com: Grasping Reality with Both Hands, May 26, 2013
    Feldstein, M. Japan's growth strategy is all wrong, Project Syndicate, Jan 18, 2013
    Krugman, P. Japan Steps out,The New York Times,Jan13, 2013

    Online Reference & Research Tools:

    1) www.economist.com
    The website of The Economist contains data updated twice a day on output, unemployment, exchange rates, inflation, interest rates and stock prices for a large number of countries.

    2) www.imf.org/external/index.htm
    The website of the International Monetary Fund provides data on 187 member countries. A particularly useful publication is the World Economic Outlook, which is published twice a year and describes major economic events in the world and in specific member countries.

    Specific and updated data on monetary aggregates and policies are also to be found on the websites of the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank:
    3) www.federalreserve.gov

    4) http://www.ecb.int

    Valutazione:
    The instructors will use various forms of assessment to calculate the final grade you receive for this course. For the record, these are listed and weighted below. The content, criteria and specific requirements for each assessment category will be explained in greater detail in class. Any questions about the requirements should be discussed directly with your faculty well in advance of the due date for each assignment.

    FORM OF ASSESSMENT VALUE
    Class Participation 10%
    Assignments 20%
    Mid-Term Exam* 30%
    Final Exam 40%


    ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW:
    Class Participation: This grade will be calculated to reflect your participation in class discussions, your capacity to introduce ideas and thoughts dealing with the texts, your ability use language effectively, and to present your analysis in intellectual, constructive argumentation. If you cannot attend classes your participation can be shown by interacting with your instructor during office hours, i.e. by asking about specific subjects of the syllabus and discussing assignments.

    Assignments: Students will be required to submit home assignments timely. These will be exercises on analytical and/or graphing tools, comments on suggested readings on examples of economic challenges, opportunities, problems or risks faced by households, firms or nations.

    Mid Term Exams*: The midterms are designed to establish and communicate to you the progress you are making towards meeting the course learning objectives on both Part I and Part II. Your abilities will be tested in two important areas of competency: the amount of information you master and the accuracy of the information you present.
    Structure: A combination of 6 to 10tests on each part, possibly including ‘true or false’, open questions, analytical exercises and graph comprehension. Prior to the examinations, a comprehensive review will be given during class.

    Final Exam: Your abilities will be tested in three important areas of competency: the amount of information you master; the accuracy of the information you present, your ability to apply your knowledge to discussing real-world cases.

    Structure: A combination of 12 tests, 6 on part I and 6 on part II, possibly including ‘true or false’, open questions, analytical exercises and graph comprehension. Prior to the examinations, a comprehensive review will be given during class. The final exam will generally include an oral discussion through which the instructor will assess the significance you ascribe to the facts and ideas you have integrated across your study in this course.

    *For students not attending classes, the mid-term exams will be waived and the grade will be calculated attributing a 70% percentage to the final exam.

  • Insegnamento Economics (91948)

    Primo anno di Global economy and business (LM-56), Dual Degree with Samara State University of Economics
    Crediti Formativi Universitari (CFU): 12,00

    Programma:
    Course Title:
    ECONOMICS
    Period: second semester

    Instructors
    SERGIO NISTICO' and ELEONORA SANFILIPPO
    contact information: s.nistico@unicas.it; e.sanfilippo@unicas.it

    Prerequisites: basic economics. Language of Instruction: English

    Overall Class hours: 84
    Class hours, part I:42
    Class hours, part II: 42
    Overall Credits (ECTS): 12

    This course is structured in two modules that will be taught in parallel during the semester.

    The first module deals with microeconomics, i.e. the set of tools economists use to study the choices made by individuals in their roles of consumers, employees, investors and business managers and the effects of individual choices on market outcomes.
    In particular, this first module focuses on:
    • rational choice theory and its claim that changes in income and prices are the determinants of consumer’s consumption choices;
    • the expected utility theory approach, according to which choices under uncertainty can be modeled as lotteries;
    • the demand for insurance policies and the limitations of the rational choice theory;
    • the difference between short-run and long-run cost functions;
    • how firms choose inputs, output and prices according to the different market structures in which they operate;
    • the difference between partial and general equilibrium analysis and the two fundamental welfare theorems;
    • why public goods and externalities represent the two main reasons for market failures and government intervention.

    The second module deals with the fundamental macroeconomics models, and their ability to interpret the real-world economic phenomena. The topics addressed by the instructor include the factors affecting changes in aggregate variables, such as GDP, unemployment rates, aggregate demand, aggregate supply, interest rates, price levels, and so on , in the context of contemporary monetary market economies.
    In particular, this second module focuses on:
    • the fundamental building blocks of Keynes’s macroeconomic theory;
    • the structure and the logic of the IS-LM model as a tool to determine the general equilibrium and the impact of economic policies both in a closed and an open economy;
    • the determinants of aggregate variables and how both fiscal and monetary policies can be effective tools for dampening business cycle and counteracting the main pathologies affecting actual economic systems, such as recession, unemployment, and crisis;
    • the main causes of unemployment and how to promote employment according to the different theoretical approaches;
    • the main determinants of economic growth;
    • how financial markets affect the real economy;
    • the relation between short-term and long-term interest rates through the yield curve and how expectations of financial markets are influenced by the behavior of central bank and the level of economic activity.

    With reference to all topics listed above, students will be asked to develop a critical attitude towards the realism and the soundness of the assumptions underlying the various models and the ability to use the relevant elements of the economists’ toolbox to specific case studies.

    INSTRUCTIONAL FORMAT
    The class will meet for 2 hours (gross of interclass break), four times a week, for a total of 42 sessions. In every week, one of the sessions will be devoted to exercise and case studies. After an introduction aimed at providing the needed background, participants are required to read the materials related to the class and to be prepared prior to coming to class. Classes will consist of a lecture by the instructor, to be followed by a discussion of the main topics and, possibly, of the assignments.

    TENTATIVE COURSE SCHEDULE

    Week 1 (Frank, chapters 1 and 2. Blanchard, chapters 1 and 2)

    Part I
    Introduction to the Course. Presentation of the Available materials. Clear Statement of Expected Mutual Requirements. The role of economic models. Thinking like an economist. Is Economics a Science? Graphing as one of the language of Economics: the budget constraint and indifference curves.

    Part II
    Introduction to the Course. Endogenous/exogenous variables and given factors. The distinction between short-run, medium-run and long-run models. Fundamental macroeconomic variables. Main economic indicators.

    Week 2 (Frank, Chapters 2 and 3. Blanchard, chapter 3)

    Part I
    Axioms of rational choice theory. The opportunity cost and the marginal rate of substitution. The best feasible bundle. The utility function approach.

    Part II
    The goods market. Main assumptions of Keynes’s model. The determination of the equilibrium level of the aggregate output using the Keynesian cross-diagram. The concept of underemployment equilibrium level of the output.

    Week 3 (Frank, appendix chapter 3 and appendix chapter 4. Blanchard, chapter 4)

    Part I
    The utility function approach. The income and substation effects of price change. The ordinary and the income compensated demand curve.

    Part II
    Financial Markets. Keynes’s theory of liquidity preference. Money supply and the determination of the equilibrium nominal interest rate. Two cases of ineffectiveness of expansionary monetary policy in Keynes’s model: Inelasticity of Investments and Liquidity Trap.

    Week 4 (Frank, chapter 5. Blanchard, chapters 5 and 6)

    Part I
    Applications of rational choice theory. The intertemporal choice

    Part II
    The IS-LM basic model for the determination of the general equilibrium position in a closed economy. Assumptions and results. Structure of the model and differences with Keynes’s model. Graphical derivation of the IS and LM curves. Analysis of the impact of fiscal and monetary policies on the general equilibrium position. Policy mix. The extended IS-LM model. The relation between real interest rate, nominal interest rate and expected inflation. Financial shocks and economic policies.

    Week 5 (Frank, chapter 6 and appendix. Blanchard, chapter 7 and appendix)

    Part I
    Incomplete information and choices under uncertainty. The expected utility theory and its limits

    Part II
    Neoclassical theory of employment versus Keynes’s theory of employment. New-Keynesian theories of the labour market. Contract theory and efficiency-wage theory. The natural rate of unemployment.

    Week 6 (Frank, chapters 7 and 8. Blanchard, chapter 10)

    Part I
    Explaining altruism and concerns about fairness. Cognitive limitations and behavioral economics.

    Part II
    Solow’s model of growth. Assumptions and main results. The depreciation per worker and the investment per worker. The steady state position.

    Mid-term exam on both part I and part II

    Week 7 (Frank, chapter 9 and appendix; chapter 10. Blanchard, chapter 11 and appendix)

    Part I
    Production and costs in the short run. Production in the long run: isoquants, isocosts and returns to scale. Cost functions in the long run.

    Part II
    Output, investment and capital accumulation. The saving rate. The dynamics of capital and output. The effects of different saving rates on output per worker in an economy with and without technological progress. The human capital. Exogenous and endogenous growth.

    Week 8 (Frank, appendix chapter 10 and chapter 11. Blanchard, chapter 14)

    Part I
    Relationship between short-run and long-run cost curves. Cost minimization. The long-run industry supply curve in perfect competition

    Part II

    Financial markets and expectations. The determination of stock prices. Stock prices and economic activity. The analysis of the impact of economic policies on stock prices by using the IS-LM diagram. The speculative bubbles. The yield curve. The relation between short-term and long term interest rates.

    Week 9 (Frank, chapter 12. Blanchard, chapters 17 and 18)

    Part I
    Monopoly and the divergence between price and marginal revenue. Mark up and price elasticity of demand. Price discrimination. Public policy towards monopoly.

    Part II
    The open economy. The equilibrium of the goods market in the open economy. The real exchange rate and the nominal exchange rate. The choice between domestic and foreign assets: the (uncovered) interest parity condition.

    Week 10 (Frank, chapter 13. Blanchard, chapters 19 and 20)

    Part I
    Imperfect competition, oligopoly and game theory. The notion of Nash equilibrium. The Cournot model of duopoly and other economic models of imperfect competition.

    Part II
    The extension of the IS-LM model to the open economy. Equations and diagrams. Exchange rate regimes and monetary and fiscal policies.

    Week 11 (Frank, chapter 16 and chapter 18W. Blanchard, chapter 23)

    Part I
    Externalities, property rights and Coase theorem. Public goods. The general equilibrium model of exchange and the Edgeworth box. Pareto optimality and the two welfare theorems.

    Part II
    Monetary Policy. Money targeting. Inflation targeting. The interest rate rule. The Optimal Inflation rate. Conventional and unconventional monetary tools.

    WORKLOAD EXPECTATIONS
    All students are expected to spend at least 2.5 hours of time on academic studies outside of, and in addition to, each hour of class time.

    Testi:
    Listed below are the required course textbooks and additional readings. These are required materials for the course and you are expected to have constant access to them from the very beginning of the course for reading, highlighting and note-taking. It is required that you have unrestricted access to each. Access to additional sources required for certain class sessions may be provided in paper or electronic format consistent with applicable copyright legislation.

    REQUIRED TEXTS:
    Frank, R.H. Microeconomics and Behavior, Mc Graw Hill, 7th(or later)edition.
    Blanchard, Macroeconomics, Chapters 1-7, 10-11, 14, 17-19, 20, 23. Pearson 2017, 7th edition
    Recommended readings (to be selected and assigned throughout the semester): The following primary and secondary materials, articles and readings are either available on the web or will be provided in Pdf format by the instructor through the GOMP and/or MOODLE platforms.
    A series of Robert H. Frank’s articles published on the New York Times
    Ball, L. The case for 4% inflation,VOX CEPR's Policy Portal, May 24, 2013
    Blanchard, O. What Size Fiscal Deficits for the United States?, Peterson Institute for International Economics, Nov 21, 2016.
    Blanchard, O. The State of Advanced Economies and Related Policy Debates: A Fall 2016 Assessment,Peterson Institute for International Economics, Policy Brief, 16-14 2016.
    Blanchard, O. How the Eurozone Can Be Strengthened After Brexit, Peterson Institute for International Economics, June 27, 2016.
    De Long, B. We Really Do Need a 4%/Year Inflation Target, Bradford-delong.com: Grasping Reality with Both Hands, May 26, 2013
    Feldstein, M. Japan's growth strategy is all wrong, Project Syndicate, Jan 18, 2013
    Krugman, P. Japan Steps out,The New York Times,Jan13, 2013

    Online Reference & Research Tools:

    1) www.economist.com
    The website of The Economist contains data updated twice a day on output, unemployment, exchange rates, inflation, interest rates and stock prices for a large number of countries.

    2) www.imf.org/external/index.htm
    The website of the International Monetary Fund provides data on 187 member countries. A particularly useful publication is the World Economic Outlook, which is published twice a year and describes major economic events in the world and in specific member countries.

    Specific and updated data on monetary aggregates and policies are also to be found on the websites of the US Federal Reserve and the European Central Bank:
    3) www.federalreserve.gov

    4) http://www.ecb.int

    Valutazione:
    The instructors will use various forms of assessment to calculate the final grade you receive for this course. For the record, these are listed and weighted below. The content, criteria and specific requirements for each assessment category will be explained in greater detail in class. Any questions about the requirements should be discussed directly with your faculty well in advance of the due date for each assignment.

    FORM OF ASSESSMENT VALUE
    Class Participation 10%
    Assignments 20%
    Mid-Term Exam* 30%
    Final Exam 40%


    ASSESSMENT OVERVIEW:
    Class Participation: This grade will be calculated to reflect your participation in class discussions, your capacity to introduce ideas and thoughts dealing with the texts, your ability use language effectively, and to present your analysis in intellectual, constructive argumentation. If you cannot attend classes your participation can be shown by interacting with your instructor during office hours, i.e. by asking about specific subjects of the syllabus and discussing assignments.

    Assignments: Students will be required to submit home assignments timely. These will be exercises on analytical and/or graphing tools, comments on suggested readings on examples of economic challenges, opportunities, problems or risks faced by households, firms or nations.

    Mid Term Exams*: The midterms are designed to establish and communicate to you the progress you are making towards meeting the course learning objectives on both Part I and Part II. Your abilities will be tested in two important areas of competency: the amount of information you master and the accuracy of the information you present.
    Structure: A combination of 6 to 10tests on each part, possibly including ‘true or false’, open questions, analytical exercises and graph comprehension. Prior to the examinations, a comprehensive review will be given during class.

    Final Exam: Your abilities will be tested in three important areas of competency: the amount of information you master; the accuracy of the information you present, your ability to apply your knowledge to discussing real-world cases.

    Structure: A combination of 12 tests, 6 on part I and 6 on part II, possibly including ‘true or false’, open questions, analytical exercises and graph comprehension. Prior to the examinations, a comprehensive review will be given during class. The final exam will generally include an oral discussion through which the instructor will assess the significance you ascribe to the facts and ideas you have integrated across your study in this course.

    *For students not attending classes, the mid-term exams will be waived and the grade will be calculated attributing a 70% percentage to the final exam.

  • Insegnamento Introduction to Economics (92727)

    Primo anno di Economia e commercio (L-33), Economics and business
    Crediti Formativi Universitari (CFU): 8,00

    Programma:
    This course is structured in two modules, taught in first and second semesters, respectively.
    The first module deals with microeconomics, i.e. the set of tools economists use to study the choices made by individuals in their roles of consumers and business managers and the effects of individual choices on market outcomes.

    In particular, this first module focuses on:
    • The cost-benefit approach to understanding economic choices;
    • Demand, Supply and competitive equilibrium;
    • The rational spending rule;
    • Short-run cost functions;
    • Firms’ choices and industry equilibrium in perfect competition;
    • Monopoly and Imperfect Competition;
    • Externalities, Taxes and Subsidies.

    Instructional Format (Part I only)
    The class will meet for 2 hours (gross of interclass break), two times a week, for a total of 21 sessions. In every week, one of the sessions will be devoted to exercise and case studies. After an introduction aimed at providing the needed background, participants are required to read the materials related to the class and to be prepared prior to coming to class. Classes will consist of a lecture by the instructor, to be followed by a discussion of the main topics and, possibly, of the assignments.

    Tentative course schedule

    Week 1 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 1)
    Introduction to the Course. Presentation of the Available materials. Clear Statement of Expected Mutual Requirements. The role of economic models. Thinking like an economist. Graphing as one of the language of Economics.

    Week 2 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 2)
    Exchange, opportunity costs and comparative advantage.

    Week 3 (Frank-Bernanke, chapters 3 and 4)
    The demand curve and the supply curve; Elasticity of demand and elasticity of supply.

    Week 4 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 5)
    The law of demand the rational spending rule.

    Week 5 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 6)
    Production and cost functions in the short run

    Week 6 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 6)
    Profit maximization of perfectly competitive firms. Mid-term exam

    Week 7 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 7)
    The different notions of economic profit and the invisible hand principle.

    Week 8 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 8)
    Imperfect Competition and Monopoly; The divergence between price and marginal revenue.

    Week 9 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 9)
    Oligopoly; Introduction to game theory

    Week 10 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter10)
    Positive and negative externalities; private and social costs and benefits

    Week 11 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 10)
    Using the demand and supply model to model compensatory taxes and subsidies. Course Review.

    Workload expectations
    All students are expected to spend at least 2.5 hours of time on academic studies outside of, and in addition to, each hour of class time.

    Testi:
    Required text:
    • Frank, R.H. and Bernanke B.S. Principles of Economics, Mc Graw Hill, 5th edition or Frank, R.H.; Ben Bernanke; Kate Antonovics; Ori Heffetz (2016) Principles of Economics, Mc Graw Hill, 6th edition.

    Additional or alternative readings:
    For the first part check whether there are additional instructor’s notes available for download in the section Didactic Materials on GOMP. For the second part you can use also W. Mitchell, L.R. Wray, M. Watts, Macroeconomics, MacMillan, 2019

    Valutazione:
    The instructors will use various forms of assessment to calculate the final grade you receive for this course. For the record, these are listed and weighted below. The content, criteria and specific requirements for each assessment category will be explained in greater detail in class. Any questions about the requirements should be discussed directly with your faculty well in advance of the due date for each assignment.

    FORM OF ASSESSMENT VALUE
    Class Participation 10%
    Assignments 20%
    Mid-Term Exam* 30%
    Final Exam 40%

  • Insegnamento Introduction to Economics (92727)

    Primo anno di Economia e commercio (L-33), Economics and business
    Crediti Formativi Universitari (CFU): 4,00

    Programma:
    This course is structured in two modules, taught in first and second semesters, respectively.
    The first module deals with microeconomics, i.e. the set of tools economists use to study the choices made by individuals in their roles of consumers and business managers and the effects of individual choices on market outcomes.

    In particular, this first module focuses on:
    • The cost-benefit approach to understanding economic choices;
    • Demand, Supply and competitive equilibrium;
    • The rational spending rule;
    • Short-run cost functions;
    • Firms’ choices and industry equilibrium in perfect competition;
    • Monopoly and Imperfect Competition;
    • Externalities, Taxes and Subsidies.

    Instructional Format (Part I only)
    The class will meet for 2 hours (gross of interclass break), two times a week, for a total of 21 sessions. In every week, one of the sessions will be devoted to exercise and case studies. After an introduction aimed at providing the needed background, participants are required to read the materials related to the class and to be prepared prior to coming to class. Classes will consist of a lecture by the instructor, to be followed by a discussion of the main topics and, possibly, of the assignments.

    Tentative course schedule

    Week 1 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 1)
    Introduction to the Course. Presentation of the Available materials. Clear Statement of Expected Mutual Requirements. The role of economic models. Thinking like an economist. Graphing as one of the language of Economics.

    Week 2 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 2)
    Exchange, opportunity costs and comparative advantage.

    Week 3 (Frank-Bernanke, chapters 3 and 4)
    The demand curve and the supply curve; Elasticity of demand and elasticity of supply.

    Week 4 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 5)
    The law of demand the rational spending rule.

    Week 5 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 6)
    Production and cost functions in the short run

    Week 6 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 6)
    Profit maximization of perfectly competitive firms. Mid-term exam

    Week 7 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 7)
    The different notions of economic profit and the invisible hand principle.

    Week 8 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 8)
    Imperfect Competition and Monopoly; The divergence between price and marginal revenue.

    Week 9 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 9)
    Oligopoly; Introduction to game theory

    Week 10 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter10)
    Positive and negative externalities; private and social costs and benefits

    Week 11 (Frank-Bernanke, chapter 10)
    Using the demand and supply model to model compensatory taxes and subsidies. Course Review.

    Workload expectations
    All students are expected to spend at least 2.5 hours of time on academic studies outside of, and in addition to, each hour of class time.

    Testi:
    Required text:
    • Frank, R.H. and Bernanke B.S. Principles of Economics, Mc Graw Hill, 5th edition or Frank, R.H.; Ben Bernanke; Kate Antonovics; Ori Heffetz (2016) Principles of Economics, Mc Graw Hill, 6th edition.

    Additional or alternative readings:
    For the first part check whether there are additional instructor’s notes available for download in the section Didactic Materials on GOMP. For the second part you can use also W. Mitchell, L.R. Wray, M. Watts, Macroeconomics, MacMillan, 2019

    Valutazione:
    The instructors will use various forms of assessment to calculate the final grade you receive for this course. For the record, these are listed and weighted below. The content, criteria and specific requirements for each assessment category will be explained in greater detail in class. Any questions about the requirements should be discussed directly with your faculty well in advance of the due date for each assignment.

    FORM OF ASSESSMENT VALUE
    Class Participation 10%
    Assignments 20%
    Mid-Term Exam* 30%
    Final Exam 40%

Prenotazione appello

E' possibile prenotarsi ad un appello d'esame, collegandosi al portale studenti.

Elenco appelli d'esame disponibili

  • Denominazione insegnamento: 10455 ECONOMICS (LEVEL INTERMEDIATE) - ECONOMIA, MANAGEMENT E FINANZA D'IMPRESA 10455 ECONOMICS (LEVEL INTERMEDIATE) - GLOBAL ECONOMY AND BUSINESS - ECONOMIA E STRATEGIE D'IMPRESA PER IL MERCATO GLOBALE 10455 ECONOMICS (LEVEL INTERMEDIATE) - ECONOMIA, IMPRESA E ISTITUZIONI 10455 ECONOMICS (LEVEL INTERMEDIATE) - ECONOMIA E DIRITTO D'IMPRESA 10455 ECONOMICS (LEVEL INTERMEDIATE) - Global economy and business 10689 ECONOMICS (LEVEL INTERMEDIATE) - Economia 10689 ECONOMICS (LEVEL INTERMEDIATE) - ECONOMIA E DIRITTO D'IMPRESA 10689 ECONOMICS (LEVEL INTERMEDIATE) - Global economy and business - Economia e strategie d'impresa per il mercato globale 10689 ECONOMICS (LEVEL INTERMEDIATE) - ECONOMIA, MANAGEMENT E FINANZA D'IMPRESA 90420 ECONOMICS 1 - Global economy and business - Economia e strategie d'impresa per il mercato globale 90420 ECONOMICS - Global economy and business - Economia e strategie d'impresa per il mercato globale 90420 ECONOMICS - MANAGEMENT 90420 ECONOMICS - Economics and entrepreneurship 91948 Economics - Economia e mercati globali 91948 Economics - Global economy and business - (2019/2020)
    Data e ora appello: 26/06/2020, ore 10:00
    Luogo: Written exam in telematic mode through Google Meet: meet.google.com/buj-uvee-tqt
    Tipo prova: prova scritta
    Prenotabile: dal 05/05/2020 al 19/06/2020 (prenota l'appello)
  • Denominazione insegnamento: 90456 ECONOMICS FOR BUSINESS - Economics and entrepreneurship - Economia e Imprenditorialità 90456 ECONOMICS FOR BUSINESS - Global economy and business 90456 ECONOMICS FOR BUSINESS - Global economy and business - Economia e strategie d'impresa per il mercato globale 90456 ECONOMICS FOR BUSINESS - ECONOMIA E DIRITTO D'IMPRESA 90456 ECONOMICS FOR BUSINESS - Management 91843 Economics for business - Economia e mercati globali 91843 Economics for business - Economia e Imprenditorialità 91843 Economics for business - Economia e Imprenditorialita' 91843 Economics for business - Economics and Entrepreneurship - (2019/2020)
    Data e ora appello: 26/06/2020, ore 16:00
    Luogo: Written exam in telematic mode through Google Meet: meet.google.com/buj-uvee-tqt
    Tipo prova: prova scritta
    Prenotabile: dal 05/05/2020 al 19/06/2020 (prenota l'appello)

SERGIO NISTICÒ:
Nato a Catanzaro il 15 luglio 1962.
POSIZIONE ATTUALE:
- Professore Associato (gruppo disciplinare SECS-P/01) presso il Dipartimento di Economia di Economia e Giurisprudenza dell'Università degli Studi di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale.
- Professore a Contratto presso la St John's University.
POSIZIONI PRECEDENTI:
- Ricercatore confermato presso il Dipartimento di Teoria Economica e Metodi Quantitativi per le Scelte Politiche dell'Università di Roma 'La Sapienza';
POSIZIONI SCIENTIFICHE ATTUALI:
- Direttore Scientifico del Centro di Ricerche Economiche su Creatività e Motivazioni, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale.
- Consulente Scientifico INARCASSA e ENPACL
- Vice Presidente CdS Corso di Laurea Magistrale in Global Economy and Business, Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale
POSIZIONI SCIENTIFICHE PRECEDENTI:
- Membro del gruppo di lavoro su “Indagini sul Clima Congiunturale e le Aspettative degli Imprenditori” istituito dalla Commissione per la Garanzia dell’Informazione Statistica presso la Presidenza del Consiglio dei Ministri.
- Membro del Collegio dei Docenti del Dottorato di Ricerca in "Economia, Comportanenti e Istituzioni" con sede presso l'Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale.
- Membro del Consiglio Direttivo dell'Associazione Italiana per la Storia dell'Economia Politica (STOREP).
- Membro Commissione Studi del Ministero dei Trasporti e della Navigazione.
STUDI:
- 1982: Research student Università di Parigi X (Nanterre);
- 1983: Research student Università di Berlino (Dahlem-Dorf);
- 1986: Laurea con lode e menzione di dignità di stampa in Scienze Politiche indirizzo politico-economico, Università di Roma 'La Sapienza';
- 1992: Dottorato di Ricerca in Economia Politica.

ATTIVITA' DI RICERCA STRUTTURATA:
• 1987-1997: Componente del gruppo di ricerca su 'Classical and Keynesian Economics' coordinato dal Prof. Giovanni Caravale e finanziato dal CNR e dal MIUR;
• 1997-2001: Coordinatore del Gruppo di Ricerca su 'The Notion of Equilibrium in Economics' finanziato dal MIUR e dalla Sapienza, Università di Roma.
• 2002-: Coordinatore del Gruppo di Ricerca su 'Notional Defined-Contribution Pension Systems', finanziato dall'Università di Cassino e del Lazio Meridionale.

PARTICIPATIONE A CONFERENZE COME INVITED SPEAKER:
• 2003: Conference on "NDC Pension Schemes", organized by the the World Bank and the Swedish National Social Insurance board, Sandhamn, September.
• 2006: Conference on "The Evolution of Consumption" organized by the Max Planck Institute for Economics Jena, December.
• 2009: Conference on "NDC pension schemes in a changing pension world", organized by the the World Bank and the Swedish National Social Insurance board, Stockholm, December.
• 2010: Conference on "The Green Paper on Pension", organized by the European Commission, Brussels, October.
• 2012: Conference on "The Extension of Social Protection", organized by the Moroccan Public Agency "Caisse de dépôt et de gestion" (CDG), Skhirat (Moroc).

ORGANIZZATORE E MEMBRO DEL COMITATO SCIENTIFICO DELLE SEGUENTI CONFERENZE:

• 1998: "Competing Economic Theories", in memory of Giovanni Caravale, University of Rome 'La Sapienza'. 4-5 June. Main contributors: Mark Blaug, Victoria Chick, Samuel Hollander, Heinz D. Kurz, Luigi L. Pasinetti, Paolo Sylos Labini, Donald A. Walker.

• 2008: "Individual Rationality and Economic Equilibrium" 2nd Giovanni Caravale memorial conference, University of Rome 'La Sapienza'. 18-19 April. Main contributors: Shaun Hargreaves Heap, Alan Kirman, Drazen Prelec.

• 2012: "How to Bring Joy into Economics Revisiting Tibor Scitovsky, Angevine- Aragonese Castle, Gaeta, 26-27 June. Main Contributors: Marina Bianchi, Robert H. Frank, George Loewenstein, Alois Stutzer.

REFEREE PER:
Cambridge Journal of Economics, Metroeconomica, History of Political Economy, Journal of Pension Economics and Finance, Review of Political Economy, Applied Economics, Economics, Economia Politica, International Advances in Economic Research, Atlantic Economic Journal

PUBBLICAZIONI RECENTI (PRINCIPALI):

Gurtovaya, V. and Nisticò, S. (2018), Does the NDC scheme mimic the French point system? Applied Economics, DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2018.1494805

Nisticò, S. and M. Bevilacqua (2017). "Some notes on the redistribution inherent in the US public pension system". Contemporary Economic Policy. DOI:10.1111/coep.12271.

Nisticò, S. (2017), « Consumption Choices and Time Use: History, Theory and Potential Empirical Evidence », Œconomia, 7-2 | 2017, 219-238.

Gurtovaya, V. and Nisticò, S. (2017), The Notional Defined Contribution Pension Scheme and the German ‘Point System’: A Comparison. German Econ Rev. doi:10.1111/geer.12127

Nisticò, S. (2015), "Enjoyment Takes Time: Some Implications for Choice Theory". Economics: The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, 9 (2015-8): pp. 1—40.

Nisticò, S. (2014), "Production of (Pleasant) Time by Means of (Unpleasant) Time: Some Notes on Consumption Theory and Time Use", Metroeconomica, 65, 2, pp. 276-297.

Nisticò, S. and M. Bevilacqua (2013) 'Notional Defined Contribution (NDC) Pension Schemes and Income Patterns', Economics: The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, 7(2013-29), pp. 1-24, June 2013.

Nisticò, S. (2013) “Financing Pay-as-You-Go Public Pension Systems: Some Notes in the Light of the Classical-Type Theory of Income Distribution”, Review of Political Economy, 25(3), pp. 373-390,.

Nisticò, S. (2012). “Comment on “Is Social Security Secure with NDC?”, in Holzmann R., E. Palmer and D. Robalino (eds), Nonfinancial Defined Contribution Pension Schemes in a Changing Pension World, Vol. II. Washington: The World Bank.

D’Orlando F. and S. Nisticò (2011). “On the Inconsistence between the Assumption of Given Quantities and the Long-Period Method” (with Fabio D’Orlando) in R. Ciccone, C. Gehrke, G. Mongiovi (eds) Sraffa and Modern Economics, London: Routledge.

Nisticò, S. (2009). “Dall'uniformità dei tassi di sostituzione all'uniformità dei rendimenti individuali: alcune riflessioni sull'equità e la sostenibilità del modello NDC", Studi e Note di Economia, vol. 14, 3, pp. 293-313.

Gronchi S, and S. Nisticò (2008) “The Theoretical Foundations of NDC Pension Schemes”, Metroeconomica, vol.58, 2.

Nisticò, S. (2007) Comment on "European State Welfare Regimes and their Generosity Towards the Elderly" by A.Boersch-Supan, in: Papadimitriou D. Government Spending on the Elderly. (pp. 48-52). Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan.

Nisticò, S. (2007). “Welfare”. In: Enciclopedia Treccani - Appendice VII, Vol. 3. (pp. 461-462). ROMA: Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana,

Gronchi S, and S. Nisticò (2006) “Implementing the NDC theoretical model: a comparison of Italy and Sweden”, (with Sandro Gronchi)) in Holzmann R., Palmer E. (eds) Pension Reform: Issues and Prospects for Non-Financial Defined Contribution (NDC) Schemes, Washington D.C.: World Bank

Nisticò, S. (2006) Discussion of J. Alho, J. Lassila, T. Valkonen “Demographic Uncertainty and Evaluation of Sustainability of Pension Systems”, in Holzmann R., Palmer E. (eds) Pension Reform: Issues and Prospects for Non-Financial Defined Contribution (NDC) Schemes, Washington D.C.: World Bank (2006).

Nisticò, S. (2005) “Consumption and Time in Economics: Prices and Quantities in a Temporary Equilibrium Perspective”, Cambridge Journal of Economics, vol.29, n.6. pp. 943-57.

Nisticò, S and G. Rodano (2005). “Reflections on Sraffa’s Legacy in Economics: A Review Essay” , Review of Political Economy, vol. 17, 3, pp. 127-143, July 2005. Reprinted in Kurz, H. L.L. Pasinetti. N. Salvadori (eds), Piero Sraffa: The Man and the Scholar Exploring His Unpublished Papers, LONDON: Routledge.

Principali interessi di ricerca: Teoria della scelta e uso del tempo; Sistemi pensionistici; Teoria dei prezzi e della distribuzione

RECENT PUBLICATIONS (MAIN):

Nisticò, S. (2019). Essentials of Pension Economics, London: Palgrave Macmillan

Gronchi, S; S. Nisticò and M. Bevilacqua (2019). “The Italian NDC Scheme: Evolution and Remaining Potholes”, in Holzmann, R. E. Palmer, R. Palacios, and S. Sacchi (eds), Progress and Challenges of Nonfinancial Defined Schemes, Whashington D.C.: The World Bank.

Gurtovaya, V. and Nisticò, S. (2019), Does the NDC scheme mimic the French point system? Applied Economics, 51 (1), pp. 117-130. DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2018.1494805

Nisticò, S. and M. Bevilacqua (2018). "Some notes on the redistribution inherent in the US public pension system". Contemporary Economic Policy, 36 (3), pp. 566-581DOI: 10.1111/coep.12271.

Gurtovaya, V. and Nisticò, S. (2018), The Notional Defined Contribution Pension Scheme and the German ‘Point System’: A Comparison. German Economic Review, 19 (4), pp. 365-382. DOI:10.1111/geer.12127.

Nisticò, S. (2017), « Consumption Choices and Time Use: History, Theory and Potential Empirical Evidence », Œconomia, 7-2 | 2017, 219-238.

Nisticò, S. (2017). Le prospettive economiche della previdenza obbligatoria. Rivista del Diritto della Sicurezza Sociale, XVII, 3, pp. 615-630. Ripubblicato in "Il sistema previdenziale italiano. Principi, struttura ed evoluzione" a cura di Edoardo Ales e Guido Canavesi. Torino: Giappichelli, pp. 23-36.

Nisticò, S. (2015), "Enjoyment Takes Time: Some Implications for Choice Theory". Economics: The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, 9 (2015-8): pp. 1—40.

Nisticò, S. (2014), "Production of (Pleasant) Time by Means of (Unpleasant) Time: Some Notes on Consumption Theory and Time Use", Metroeconomica, 65, 2, pp. 276-297.

Nisticò, S. and M. Bevilacqua (2013) 'Notional Defined Contribution (NDC) Pension Schemes and Income Patterns', Economics: The Open-Access, Open-Assessment E-Journal, 7(2013-29), pp. 1-24, June 2013.

Nisticò, S. (2013) “Financing Pay-as-You-Go Public Pension Systems: Some Notes in the Light of the Classical-Type Theory of Income Distribution”, Review of Political Economy, 25(3), pp. 373-390.

Nisticò, S. (2012). “Comment on “Is Social Security Secure with NDC?”, in Holzmann R., E. Palmer and D.Robalino (eds), Nonfinancial Defined Contribution Pension Schemes in a Changing Pension World, Vol. II. Washington: The World Bank.

D’Orlando F. and S. Nisticò (2011). “On the Inconsistence between the Assumption of Given Quantities and the Long-Period Method” (with Fabio D’Orlando) in R. Ciccone, C. Gehrke, G. Mongiovi (eds) Sraffa and Modern Economics, London: Routledge.

Nisticò, S. (2009). “Dall'uniformità dei tassi di sostituzione all'uniformità dei rendimenti individuali: alcune riflessioni sull'equità e la sostenibilità del modello NDC", Studi e Note di Economia, vol. 14, 3, pp. 293-313.

Gronchi S, and S. Nisticò (2008) “The Theoretical Foundations of NDC Pension Schemes”, Metroeconomica, vol.58, 2, pp. 131-159.

Nisticò, S and G. Rodano (2008). “Reflections on Sraffa’s Legacy in Economics: A Review Essay” , in Kurz, H. L.L. Pasinetti. N. Salvadori (eds), Piero Sraffa: The Man and the Scholar Exploring His Unpublished Papers, LONDON: Routledge. (first published in 2005 in Review of Political Economy, vol. 17, 3, pp. 127-143, July 2005.).

Nisticò, S. (2007) Comment on "European State Welfare Regimes and their Generosity Towards the Elderly" by A.Boersch-Supan, in: Papadimitriou D. Government Spending on the Elderly. (pp. 48-52). Basingstoke:
Palgrave Macmillan.

Gronchi S, and S. Nisticò (2006) “Implementing the NDC theoretical model: a comparison of Italy and Sweden”, (with Sandro Gronchi)) in Holzmann R., Palmer E. (eds) Pension Reform: Issues and Prospects for
Non-Financial Defined Contribution (NDC) Schemes, Washington D.C.: World Bank

Nisticò, S. (2005) “Consumption and Time in Economics: Prices and Quantities in a Temporary Equilibrium Perspective”, Cambridge Journal of Economics, vol.29, n.6. pp. 943-57.

Nisticò, S. (2002). “Classical-type temporary positions: a cost-plus model”. Journal of Post Keynesian Economics, vol. 25, pp. 83-103.

Nisticò, S. and D. Tosato (eds) (2002). Competing Economic Theories: Essays in Memory of Giovanni Caravale. London: Routledge.

[Ultima modifica: mercoledì 30 novembre 2016]